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"It's Science" Videos

It's Science: Guilherme Mendes

its science guilherme mendes photo
[youtube http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=5ZtTRrBPDOA?rel=0&w=560&h=315]
Welcome to another episode of “It’s Science”. We  continue our 2013 season with a quick look at Guilherme Mendes (2011-2013). Now on to the fun stuff…
Abstract: All matches observed of Guilherme Mendes used in this small sample occurred at IBJJF events, inside his weight division, and between 2011-2013. Only techniques, occurrences, and outcomes that were recorded are displayed in the data below (i.e. if no butterfly sweeps occurred, there will not be a representation of that in the sample data). Matches were selected at random based on available matches  – selected using a random generator from 18 total available IBJJF matches matches between 2011-2013. This is a limited sample – but given the estimated amount of matches in this time period – it is well above the percentage necessary to create a scientifically validated trend sampling.
So what did we learn?: Guilherme Mendes is an impressive competitor. Much like his brother, he is quite good at avoiding defeat. Inside this study – which took place between 2011 and 2013  – there was only one loss on his record. The best way to describe his style is, “insistent”. He insisted upon a handful of techniques, and was able to put himself in the exact position to execute these moves with absolute precision. Approximately 81% of his passes were executed in a very similar fashion – Half-Guard, knee slide, and nearly 88% of his sweep came from a  De La Riva to berimbolo-style of attack. His game was very effective. It saw him finish almost 60% of his matches by submission, and it him in position to be the first to score in 100% of the matches in that he was the victor. In observing his style and performance, I believe this is a very important metric for Guilherme. By being the first to score in his matches, he immediately put his opponent on defense, and was able to stay ahead and inside his own comfort zone. In his sole loss he did not score first, and was unable to build his normal momentum through out the match.
There is a lot that the average competitor can learn from Guilherme Mendes style and approach. While the techniques are far from “simple”, his approach and execution is very basic. He kept his attacks to a handful of techniques, and insisted upon them from the beginning. One thing to learn from his competitive approach, is that by building a match around your strengths from the start, you can put yourself in a consistently offensive game. This can help reduce hesitation and can ensure that techniques are executed properly under pressure.

Notable Stats:

    • 7:15 was his average match length
    • Won 58% of his matches by submission
    • Scored first in 100% of his wins (91% total)
    • Passed from the half-guard 81.5% of the time
    • 88% of sweeps occured from the De La Riva guard
    • He preferred knee-cut passes to leg drag passes 13/2
    • Approximately 77% of his submissions were from the side control position
    • When on the feet he preferred pulling guard – as he did so 85% of the time
Top Competitor Guilherme Mendes
Successes Side Control Submissions
Avoided… Mount
Top Technique 1 Knee Through Pass From Half-Guard
Top Technique 2 Berimbolo
Number of Matches Observed 12
Submits Opponent 7
Wins by Points 4
Minutes of footage watched 87
Scores First 11
Total Wins 11
Total Loses 1
Sweeps (Position)
De la Riva Sweeps 7
50/50 1
Sweeps (Type)
Ankle Pick sweep 1
Berimbolo-style (kiss of the dragon, etc.) 7
Total Sweeps 8
Passes (Position)
On Knees 1
Half-Guard 13
Standing 2
Passes (Type)
leg drag 2
knee through 13
x-pass 1
Total Passes 16
Taking the Back
side control 4
Total Back-Takes 4
Submissions (Position)
Back 2
Side Control 5
Submissions (Type)
choke from back 2
gi choke (Guilitine, Brabo, Basball Bat) 5
Total Subs: 7
Takedown/ Ground Establishment
Double-Guard Pull 3
Guard Pull 9
ankle pick 2
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Uncategorized

3 Ways to Improve Your Jiu Jitsu Outside of the Academy

improve bjj
By: Tyler Bishop
Have you ever said to yourself, “there are only so many hours in the day”? I’m sure we all have. The same sentiment is true when it comes to jiu jitsu. The academy may only be open certain hours, you may have to work, your training partners may have to work, teammates could be hurt, you may be hurt, the list goes on and on. To develop quickly in jiu jitsu, time is of the essence. As it’s often said, it’s not how much time you have, it’s how you use it. To improve your training practices, it is vitally important to dedicate time outside of the academy towards developing your technique, physical condition, and mindset.
If you were in school and wanted to get an “A” in class it would take extra effort outside of class, right? The same is true with jiu jitsu. These three methods for improving jiu jitsu outside of the academy (listed below) can help you begin developing an “A” level game today.
1:)Improve your body mechanics: David Adiv talked about this at length in our most recent podcast, and for good reason. Body mechanics make up the basis for all of jiu jitsu. If you cannot perform the movements necessary for a half guard sweep, side control escape, or armlock defense on their own, how do expect to perform those techniques against a live opponent? Many of these body mechanics can be found online, and many academies do movements like this as a part of the class warm-ups already. So why only do them in class? You don’t need a partner for any of these, and can practice them at night before bed, in the morning before work, or when you are chilling and watching TV. I cannot stress enough how important it is to develop solid fundamental body mechanics. Without these movements it will be incredibly difficult to perfect any jiu jitsu techniques. We will post some more body mechanic movements in the coming weeks, so stay tuned.
2:)Use online resources to perfect techniques you are already good at: There have never been more online training resources available than there are today. You can learn directly from Marcelo Garcia, The Mendes Bros., Saulo and Xande Ribeiro, Andre Galvao, Draculinho, and more – all by making a few mouse clicks. Short on cash? Browse YouTube for a bit and find some quality videos from top-level instructors. However, there is one-catch. If you could learn jiu jitsu solely by watching videos on the internet there would be 3x as many black belts in the world than there are today. Jiu jitsu is largely based on feeling, accepting, and applying techniques in live training or drilling  scenarios. That’s why one of the most efficient way to use online resources is to use them to develop techniques you already understand.
Are you good at the deep half guard? How about triangles from mount? Try finding good video and supplementary material from qualified instructors that highlight the techniques you feel you are already pretty good at. You will learn to see new details that will further improve these techniques, and you may also learn some new transitions and grips that help you improve in other areas as well. This method of learning is much easier to apply because you already have a strong mechanical understanding of the techniques explained. If you can already understand what the technique feels like you will find it easier to appreciate and understand the new concepts the instructor explains in the technique. If you can efficiently use these resources to improve the things you are already good at it will make you an even stronger competitor as well, because you will have more tools that allow you to drag your opponent into “your fight”.
3:) Set goals: My instructor, JW Wright, has always been a huge proponent of his students writing down their goals. It gives them a way of outlining and thinking about where they want to go in jiu jitsu, and provides him a way of understanding how to prepare them and develop them through their jiu jitsu joruney. This seems very simple, but is very effective. In fact, research tells us that this is true in almost everything. By clearly defining our goals,we – as humans -typically do a better job of accomplishing things. In jiu jitsu it’s good to set yearly goals like: compete at the Mundials, win a local tournament, get a blue belt, or even win an IBJJF medal. But, you can take this one step further and begin defining your development towards these goals with weekly goals. By developing this into a micro-strategy you can measure and control your development on an even greater level.
So what does that look like? Start by determining your goals for the year, then work backwords. If you are preparing for some type of competition you will have to be in shape, have a gameplan, perfected techniques you plan to use, and prepared properly for the event. How can you move closer to those things on a weekly basis? Maybe you need to ensure some extra time at the gym each week, perhaps you need to drill your best techniques a few more times after class, or maybe you need to sit down with your instructor to define a gameplan. No matter the long term goal, sit down and figure out what weekly goals will lead you closer to the ultimate one. No matter your long-term goal there is always some defined efforts that you can start this week that will move you closer. Doing techniques in class, then rolling is not specifc to your goals – those things are specific to anyone who generally wants to get better at jiu jitsu. Take some extra time, and put forth that extra effort.
We will have some more information about body mechanics up next week. Until then, let us know if any of these practices work for you by commenting below.

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BishopBjj News

Podcast #3 Featuring David Adiv

david adiv podcast banner

Check out our latest podcast with special guest Master David Adiv!

Either listen to it on this page  or download using the link below!

(Chirbit will play in browsers, smartphone browsers, and can be downloaded in MP3 format)

Listen: podcast #3

Listen on Chirbit: http://chirb.it/mCkqqM

We will have iTunes and Google Play versions of the podcast up as soon as we can figure it out, haha.

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BishopBjj News

2013 Pan Jiu Jitsu Predictions

pan dredict
We watch a lot of film at BishopBjj.com. In fact, whilst studying the 2012 World Championships for our study, we watched over 200 matches in a 2 week period of time. That certainly doesn’t make us experts, but it does make our opinions a little bit more informed than the average guy. Based on our knowledge, here are Tyler’s adult male picks for the 2013 Pan  Jiu Jitsu Championship.
Rooster: It’s hard to envision a scenario in which Caio Terra and Bruno Malfacine don’t meet in the finals. With Bruno coming off of injury Caio is the popular choice, but if Bruno has been able to maintain his physical abilities it is hard to see him losing
Bruno Malficine
Light-Feather: Let’s be honest, with only 11 guys in the division it looks as though Gui Mendes will probably clean up. His only recent loss is to Bruno – who moved down again to rooster again this year – so I predict an easy road for Gui Mendes.
Guilherme Mendes
Feather: This is such a tough weight class that likely comes down to the big 4  – Tanquinho, Cobrinha, Mario Reis, and Rafael Mendes. Mendes will be tough to beat, and there is strong chance he will meet Tanquinho or Cobrinha in the finals.
Cobrinha
Light: This weight class is full of talent, and with the exit of Leandro Lo, the field is wide open. The door is open for JT Torres to finally nab his title, but it’s likely that the current going-on’s of his former team have affected his training, so it’s probably safer to go with one of the boys from Alliannce (Lucas Lepri, or Micheal Langhi)
Close out – Langhi and Lepri
Middle: Possibly the toughest of weight classes, it is truly up for grabs. Leandro Lo will give everyone in the division a tough time, and suspect he makes it into the finals. However; Kayron Gracie always seems to come out of nowhere for at least one event a year.
Kayron Gracie
Middle-Heavy: This is going to be Galvao and Barral’s division to lose. I expect an epic rematch in the finals
Romulo Barral
Heavy: No Rodolfo, no problem. Expect a war in the division.
Roberto Alencar
Super-Heavy: Unfortunately, we’ve seen this before. It’s hard to imagine anyone in this division dethroning Faria or Nogueira.
Close out Faria and Nogueira
Ultra-Heavy: Buchecha is certainly the favorite, but don’t sleep on Orlando Sanchez. Sanchez looked hard to beat in Chicago earlier this year. Also, athletes like Alexander Trans and Gustavo Dias will not make it easy for the young Checkmat competitor.
Buchecha

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BishopBjj News

Pan Jiu Jitsu Preview

[youtube http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=C4GoX-7q75A?rel=0&w=560&h=315]
In honor of the largest jiu jitsu tournament in the word, the Pan Ams, we’ve decided to start our preview with a look at the past. The video above highlights some of the best moments and most fierce action from the past years Pan Ams.
Speaking of the past, BishopBjj.com specializes in evaluating and measuring past jiu jitsu activities. The 2012 Pan Ams was our first large scale study on jiu jitsu ever conducted. We continued that effort at the 2012 World Championships, and will keep it moving this year with our evaluation of the 2013 Pan this week. This is very exciting – as it will mark the first time in history that we can evaluate real trends in jiu jitsu empirically. For some, this could not be more boring, so below we have done our best to make it interesting.
Last year, we observed that nearly 80% of adult black belt matches resulted in the first person to score being the winner. I suspect this will not change much this year. This was a trend that was largely intact at the 2012 Worlds as well. However, as tactics, positions, and strategies change there is no telling what effect this could have on the scoring paradigm. What do you think, are first points going to be just as valuable this year as they were last year?
Is guard pulling here to stay? Well obviously there will always be guard pullers, but at black belt adult last year nearly 70% of competitors pulled guard. Will this trend continue in 2013? My belief is that the trend will begin to swing back in another direction this year as advanced guard games have been studied more and new techniques have been developed, but it is hard to predict. The other question is if it continues will it remain a successful strategy? Last year the money was on guard pullers. They won nearly 60% of their matches. The only more successful strategy is taking the opponent down, which resulted in a victory rate of almost 73% (note: they also score first, so it’s kind of a double-whammy). Also, will we see this trend expand into the larger weight classes like we started to see in the worlds study last year, or will the big guys continue to fight for the top position? these will all be very interesting questions to answer
Finally, who’s going to win, and who’s going to steal the show? Last year Rafael Mendes stole the show by defeating Cobrinha with a nasty armlock, and Bruno Malficine prevented the lighter Mendes brother, Guilherme, from joining his brother atop the podium. Who will be this years standouts? It’s extremely likely that someone from the young crop of fresh black belts is able to surprise several veterans this year, but it’s hard to tell who will be the one to step up. What are your thoughts?
We will see you there, and will be providing daily media updates (including fresh footage), so stay tuned and keep checking the site everyday!!!

Categories
Live Technique and Perspective Videos

Omoplata To 50/50 Guard Armbar

[youtube http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=b9mJc-kd0wY&w=560&h=315]
We don’t really put out a lot of “technique videos”, mostly because the internet is saturated with them, but the feedback we’ve been getting has been asking for a little bit more of this kind of stuff. So we’ve decided to put a few videos up here and there for those who are interested. We decided to keep it primarily focused on unique techniques that we have proven in competition. This 50/50 armbar from a failed omoplata fits the bill pretty well, so we will start with it.
This technique is actually pretty hard to get because 90% of it depends on your opponent. If he doesn’t react by grabbing your collar and pressing into you once you’ve established 50/50 you have to switch to a different technique. We hope you enjoy.

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"It's Science" Videos

It's Science: Rafael Lovato Jr.

[youtube http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=2VDZXnFdEmw&w=560&h=315]
Welcome to another episode of “It’s Science”. We are going to continue our 2013 season with a quick look at Rafael Lovato Jr.
Abstract: All matches observed of Rafael Lovato Junior used in this small sample occurred at IBJJF events, in his weight division, and between 2009-2013. Only techniques, occurrences, and outcomes that were recorded are displayed in the data below (i.e. if no butterfly sweeps occurred, there will not be a representation of that in the sample data). Matches were selected at random based on available matches via YouTube – selected using a random generator from 20 total available IBJJF matches matches between 2009-2013. This is a limited sample – but given the estimated amount of matches in this time period – it is well above the percentage necessary to create a scientifically validated trend sampling.
So what did we learn?: Rafael Lovato Jr. is a tale of two different approaches. One trend that we have noticed when doing these “It’s Science” studies is that most players have a very defined game. There are usually a small set of techniques that tend to crop up over and over again. In the case of Lovato, he both reinforces and bucks that trend. From his guard,  Rafael Lovato showed greater variance in techniques that were executed than any other player we’ve seen. He applied multiple types of guards and sweeps successfully. He never stuck with a particular guard that wasn’t yielding positive results very long before he would switch to another variation. However, when passing the guard he executed the direct opposite strategy. All of his passes in this small sample occurred from the half guard, and from the half-guard only 2 different passes were used. The other real difference we noticed in Lovato’s game – from others – was his lack of attention to first points. His opponents pulled guard on him in over 2/3 of his matches, and often he was not the first to score (only scored first in 60% of matches won). This did not largely effect his results. As out studies have shown over and over again, most of the time scoring first directly correlates with winning (Kron Gracie was the only outlier). Rafael Lovato seems to be heading in the same direction. It will be interesting to see how this trend develops.

Notable Stats:

  • 6 of 10 sweeps observed came from different positions
  • He submitted his opponent in 40% of his wins
  • 100% of his submissions occurred from mount
  • His opponent pulled guard on him in 69% of matches
  • 57% of his passes ended in mount, rather than side-control
  • His average match length was 8.50 minutes
  • Scored first in 60% of matches
Top Competitor **Rafael Lovato Jr.**
Successes Guard Versatility
Avoided… Pulling Guard
Top Technique 1 Half-Guard Pass To Mount
Top Technique 2 Collar Chokes From Mount
Number of Matches Observed 13
Submits Opponent 4
Wins by Points 6
Minutes of footage watched 113
Scores First 6
Total Wins 10
Total Loses 3
Sweeps (Position)
De la Riva Sweeps 1
Spider Sweeps 2
Closed Guard 2
X-Guard 3
Butterfly 1
Sit-up Guard 1
Sweeps (Type)
X-Guard 3
Tomanagi 2
Scissor 1
Sit-up and overtake opponent 1
Omoplata sweep 2
Collar Drag/Arm Drag 1
Total Sweeps 10
Passes (Position)
Half-Guard 7
Passes (Type)
knee through 3
knee up, from hg to mount 4
Total Passes 7
Taking the Back
Guard 1
Total Back-Takes 1
Submissions (Position)
Mount 4
Submissions (Type)
collar choke  top 2
neck choke (Guilitine, Brabo, etc.) 1
triangle 1
Total Subs 4
Start of Match
Pulls guard 2
Executes A Throw 1
Pulled on by opponent 9
Taken down 1
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Live Technique and Perspective Videos

Jiu Jitsu World Pro Trials Short Film

[youtube http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=i-FdqrDeCyc&w=560&h=315]
This is a short film we shot during the 2013 San Antonio Jiu Jitsu Pro Trials. We wanted to practice our skills and abilities in film making in preparation for some of the larger events this year. Let us know what you think. There is some great footage from the event. If you have never been to a pro trial before, this film certainly provides a unique insight into the inner-workings. We hope you enjoy.

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BishopBjj News

BishopBjj.com Podcast #1

[vimeo http://www.vimeo.com/58993830 w=500&h=281]
Our first podcast was recorded at the World Pro Trials in San Antonio this past weekend. It is not up to snuff in comparison to the quality of material we normally produce, but since this is the first one we expect significant improvement each time we create a podcast. Rather than scrapping this one we choose to release it. The content of the conversations is really funny and interesting good. Also, check out some of the funny stories about crazy training partners at the end!
We mention an interview with David Adiv in the podcast. Unfortunately, we are saving that for episode #2. We are purchasing some new podcast software so that we can improve the quality and production of the podcast, and wanted to save that material until the new stuff was in place. This podcast features Royler Gracie black belt, JW Wright, Abu Dhabi Pro absolute champion, Nick Scrock, 6x World Medalist, Jena Bishop, and Jon Perrine.
We appreciate any feedback, and are looking forward to this process as it improves.
-Tyler

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BJJ Study and Statistics Articles

Pass The Guard Like Leo Vieira

Don’t You Wish You Could Pass Like Leo?

By: Tyler Bishop
In 2005, the event that everyone was talking about was Rickson’s Budo Challenge. It was a tournament done in an unusual format, with a unique scoring system that primarily rewarded submission attempts over positioning. Naturally, young up and coming jiu jitsu nerds watched in awe of the likes Leo Vieira effortless passing the guard, but what is most amazing is how impressive this performance remains today.
With the resurgence of submission only BJJ tournaments, many should look at this past event for inspiration. This was not a submission only event, but the rules certainly inspired action. However, I did not write this article to talk about tournament formats, and point-systems. I wrote it to talk about the impressive passing acumen of Leo Vieira in his prime. The reason the rules are important is because they allowed Leo Vieira to cut lose, and the results were down right scary. In his first match Leo Vieira fought Barret Yoshida. Yoshida was well known (and still is) for his dynamic and aggressive guard. In this case, Leo was far more aggressive in his passing. Leo attacked Yoshida’s guard relentlessly. It wasn’t until I finally broke down the film – piece by piece  – that I could finally understand the genius and detail of Leo’s passing style this day.
x-pass leo
Leo’s first pass was a great X-guard pass – in which Yoshida appeared stunned. Leo attacked the sit-up guard by positioning his legs out of reach, attaching his grip to the knee, and his other grip to the collar. Before Yoshida could react, Leo stepped out of range, and onto Yoshida’s stomach. Leo kept both grips, solidified his base through his opponent, and scored his first pass of the day.
leg weave leo
Another one of Leo’s impressive passes that day was from the leg weave position. It seemed to catch Yoshida by surprise. Leo attacked the pass by threading his arm between the legs, stepping his leg out of half guard, then pressuring Yoshida to defend the same side pass. When Yoshida commits to the defense, Leo steps over the legs, and switches his hips while maintaining his leg grip. This allows Leo to establish another effortless looking pass.
grips leo
Finally – one of the most important details I noticed in studying this match from 8 years ago – is the ability of Leo to control space when passing. A large part of this control comes from one specific grip. Leo dominated the grips in this match, and that is why he passed the guard close to 10 times. But, it was the grip shown above that really gave Yoshida the most problems. Many guard passers will control the knees or shins. Leo controlled the very end of the pants, and used this to continually nullify and pass Yoshida’s guard. He was able to setup multiple passes from this grip, and ultimately went on to when the match by double digits.
In this day and age – where the guard player has such an impressive arsenal of attacks, it is good to study someone who has effectively shutdown this time of game before. Sure, guard games are evolving, and there is only one Leo Vieira, but is it possible that we are missing techniques and strategies that could be saving all passers a lot of energy? You tell me. Hopefully this was as helpful and insightful to you, as it was for me. You can watch the entire match of Leo vs. Yoshida below.
God Bless – Tyler
[youtube http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=2ZdkQ4yHw2o&w=560&h=315]