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"It's Science" Videos

Jiu Jitsu Is Science by David Adiv

There are few I have learned more about jiu jitsu from than David Adiv. He is both a master of the art of jiu jitsu, and a masterful human being. It is my pleasure to do my part in sharing him and his teaching with the world.
In this excerpt from our podcast with him, David describes why jiu jitsu is a lot more scientific than philosophical.

Video of David Adiv explaining jiu jitsu

[youtube=http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=853q0bhg3T8&w=560&h=315]

David Adiv’s recent notoriety in the UFC

David has recently had his profile raised due to his presence in the corner of UFC fighter Mickey Gall. Mickey has given a lot of credit to David and his training for his success in the Octagon.
When commentating on his brown belt in jiu jitsu following his victory over the acclaimed CM Punk Mickey had this to say…

“Actually, I’m a brown belt in Gracie Jiu Jitsu under Master david Adiv!”

david adiv bjj
David was also known for being in Royler Gracie’s corner during many of his legendary matches during his MMA as well.
David is one of the grappling and mixed martial art’s best kept secrets; as he is not a self-promotional individual. He is a source of powerful source of wisdom and knowledge for all of his students.

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BishopBjj News

Jena Bishop Highlight 2013

Check out Jena’s highlight video from this year. It was a big year for her. She earned her first world championship and punched a ticket to the Abu Dhabi World Pro. She is currently preparing for her first full year at black belt.
Note: Her friends lovingly call her “the truth” because she has a propensity for “telling it like it is”, no frills haha.
[youtube=http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=G8royhmYCJI&w=560&h=315]

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Interviews

BishopBjj Podcast #11: Guest Bear Quitugua f/ Shoyoroll

Check out the latest episode of the podcast featuring Bear from Shoyoroll. We discuss the World Jiu Jitsu Expo, ADCC, The Miyao Brothers, and much more.

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Guest Article

The Takedown Blue Print

DVD cover with 1 disc
We don’t promote a lot of outside material here, but this new takedown for BJJ series is on another level. It also has some serious credibility behind it.
The Takedown Blue Print is a new series by Olympic Judo medalist  Jimmy Pedro and Olympic team member Travis Stevens.
Whether you are a BJJ practitioner looking to improve your throws or a high level Judo practitoner looking for help from the very best, 4x Olympian Jimmy Pedro – The Best US Judo Competitor ever and 2x Olympian Travis Stevens will show you in tremendous detail how to take your opponent down.”
Throws such as
– Osoto Gari
– Ouchi Gari
– Ippon Seoi Nage
– Drop Seoi Nage
– Sumi Gaeshi
– Foot Sweeps
– Tai Otoshi
In addition, Travis and Jimmy teach you to deal with the most troublesome BJJ competitors including
– Wrestlers
– The guy who grabs double lapels
– the guard puller
It you can’t take your opponent down, you are not a complete grappler and this DVD will help you get there.
Here is a sample technique against a guy who grabs double lapels:  http://www.mediafire.com/download/o1vrruth5yzlc38/Successful_Take_Downs.mp4
People are really liking this throw  by Travis at Copa Podio as well:  http://takedownblueprint.com/semifinal/
We seriously recommend checking it out, and upping your takedown game.

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Live Technique and Perspective Videos

The Evil Jiu Jitsu Truth: 3 Ways To Prevent Regression

regression
By: Tyler Bishop
“Dude, screw it. I think I am getting worse”, said my friend as we changed in the locker room after class. Not exactly the kind of thing you would expect to hear from a purple belt after class, right? So I asked him, “What’s up? Just having a bad day”? His reply helped me uncover something about jiu jitsu that I think most of us know deep down, but shy away from. He answered me by saying, “Nah, I just don’t train right. I just come in and roll, and now these little jerks are starting to berimbolo my face off. I am just behind. I think I probably use to be better than I am now”.
As a white belt or blue belt it’s not uncommon to view jiu jitsu as a linear upwards projection. You start knowing absolutely nothing.  And although we all advance at different velocities, everyone can learn and progress through jiu jitsu. However, what many fail to realize – especially early on – is that jiu jitsu is not something that remains a simple time in = development out formula. We often assume that if we put time into jiu jitsu we will receive that equal output back out in terms of progress. It’s confusing, because this formula actually is 100% correct when we start jiu jitsu. You’ve heard the saying “there’s no where to go but up”, right? It’s easy to see that some get more output from their time in while others might receive very  little, but it’s easy to recognize this formulas existence… in the beginning. But as we progress through jiu jitsu, the evil truth that can be convenient to ignore is that once we have progressed to a certain point of competency in jiu jitsu that formula actually disappears.
Gasp! You mean that I could show up to jiu jitsu, train all night, and not get any better. Yes, that is what I am proposing – and not only that. I am suggesting that there are circumstances in which you could actually regress.
It’s no secret that we all get older, develop injuries, and so on, but the truth is that losing performance in this manner is normal. However, developing an inefficiency in our development in performance due to training habits or methods is unnecessary. It’s easy to prevent. My friend that I described in the beginning would have to do very little to turn his regression into progression. The only thing he has to realize is that his effort must now be more thoughtful than it was before. He can no longer rely on the formula that works in the beginning (time in = development out). He must now start to strategically consider his progression when attending practice, and take additional steps to encourage his development. Let me break this down by recommending 3 easy strategies…

#1: You have to want to get better, and think about your progression outside of jiu jitsu

If you show up to practice and are counting the others around you to take take control of your progression you have already fallen behind. Your training partners and instructors should have your best interests in mind at all times, but that doesn’t mean they know all of your struggles, strengths, weaknesses, and so forth.  You have to want to get better for yourself. This means leveraging the resources around you to get better, not counting on them to do it for you.
To take matters into you own hands, simply start planning your development outside of class. Think about new positions that you would like to learn or work on. Ask your instructors questions about these new positions, or pull a classmate aside at an open mat and work through the position. This kind of forethought will help organize your training and will provide some focus that can lead to steady progression.
In a worse case scenario in which you are truly crunched for time and training, try subscribing to an online academy and analyzing techniques outside of class. Pay attention to the details, and find time to drill these techniques with a teammate. By Taking extra time to work on the techniques that matter to you, your efforts to improve are likely to increase as well.

#2 Challenge yourself, and step outside of the norm

Guess what? It’s pretty easy to show up everyday to class and roll with the same bunch of folks day in and day out. Maybe you avoid the big guy, the new guy, or the guy that’s really good. Why? It’s convenient, easy, and comfortable. However, progress is usually a little bit more difficult than that.
To push your development along, try training and rolling with new people at your academy. Their reactions and style may force you to improve or adjust your “go to” techniques. These adjustments are a form of progress.
I have a really talented training partner that has helped me significantly develop my guard game. He is so incredibly strong and talented that there are certain techniques that just don’t work very well against him. This was not a fun thing to learn or develop. It meant having my guard passed a lot! However, training with him has helped me make my guard that much harder to pass.
This is actually one of the quickest and easiest ways to develop, but it is often the most painful. Don’t worry about your pride, or about being uncomfortable. Just think about getting better.

#3 Take private lessons

You’re not the best in the world. Chances are, you’re not even close. Hopefully, you’re not even close to the best at your academy. This means that there are a lot of people around you that you can learn from. One of the best ways to learn from a  higher belt or instructor is to do a private lesson with them.
Many good instructors can help you pick out and identify exactly what you need to work on, but I think it’s better if you have some of this already in mind. But just like in number 1, don’t just have something generic in mind and show up counting on the instructor to learn for you. Have some specific things in mind (i.e. I want to learn how to make my De La Riva Sweeps better – rather than – I want to learn sweeps).
Private lessons aren’t cheap, and can be a waste of money if you don’t invest yourself into really learning and applying these techniques. I have taught private lessons before then watched the person I did the lesson with roll for an hour without trying a single one of the techniques we trained. Make sure that you get your money out of your lesson. Insist on the techniques you learn. Force them down the throats of your training partners. Accept the failures and learn from them. That’s the only way/ If you are afraid to try the techniques you will have wasted your dollars ( or pesos).

I hope this has all been helpful. It’s easy to forget how easy progression was at white belt, but often we do very little different when that progression wears off. Hopefully, this can provide some much needed motivation to help you improve your jiu jitsu.

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"It's Science" Videos

It's Science: Rubens "Cobrinha" Charles

[youtube=http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=3-qsrivMmew&w=560&h=315]
Welcome to another episode of “It’s Science”. We  continue our 2013 season with a look at Rubens “Cobrinha” Charles (2010-2013). Now on to the fun stuff…
 
Abstract: All matches observed of Cobrinha used in this small sample occurred at gi IBJJF events, inside his weight division, and between 2010-2013. Only techniques, occurrences, and outcomes that were recorded are displayed in the data below (i.e. if no butterfly sweeps occurred, there will not be a representation of that in the sample data). Matches were selected at random based on available matches  – selected using a random generator from 20 total available IBJJF matches matches between 2010-2013. This is a limited sample – but given the estimated amount of matches in this time period – it is well above the percentage necessary to create a scientifically validated trend sampling.
Breakdown: Some things simply get better with age. Cobrinha may be a perfect example of this mantra. While Rubens Charles once reigned as king of the featherweight class, it’s in the last few years where he may be at his most dominant. We decided to only study the past 3 years of competition to keep techniques and styles relevant, in doing-so we leave out a lot of the bulk of Cobrinha’s career. Fortunately, he has remained competitive and strong. In fact, one could argue that today, in 2013, he is at his very best.
Most impressively, Cobrinha submitted his opponent in 9 out of the 14 matches we observed. That’s a 75% submission rate in all of his tournament wins. You would be hard pressed to find many other active competitors doing the same, much less one that is over the age of 30. His average match length was very short because of this – roughly 6:15. When matches are short, it allows you to be aggressive, fast, and dynamic. Cobrinha does exactly that. He pulled guard in almost all of his matches, and used a slick combination of De La riva Guard and Sit-up guard to score first by sweeping his opponent. His opponents often made the mistake of fighting the sweep and giving their back. This was the beginning of their untimely end. In our observation, Conbrinha did not lose the back once. Once he got to your back, you were finished!
It’s not often you find a competitor who not only stands the test of time, but improves as they get older. Cobrinha is likely to join the ranks of top competitors like Saulo and Xande Ribeiro, Royler Gracie, Pe De Pano, and Megaton – to name a few – that have been a force at their weight well into their master and senior years.  This was truly one of the most fun studies we have done.
Notable stats:

  • Submitted 75% of his opponents in winning matches
  • Scored first 58% of the time
  • Pulled guard 79% of the time
  • 56% of his sweeps came from the Sit-up guard
  • He averaged 1.12 sweeps per match
  • He finished a choke from the back in 5/5 matches in which he achieved the position
  • 83% of his passes were a “knee-through style” pass
  • His average match length was approximately 6:15 (almost the length of a blue belts full match)

 

Top Competitor Cobrinha
Successes Sit-up guard
Avoided… Takedowns
Top Technique 1 Sit-up guard to Single Leg
Top Technique 2 Choke from the back
Number of Matches Observed 14
Submits Opponent 9
Wins by Points 3
Minutes of footage watched 84 minutes
Scores First 10
Total Wins 12
Total Loses 2
Sweeps (Position)
De la Riva Sweeps 5
Spider Sweeps 2
Sit-up Guard 8
Sweeps (Type)
Ankle Pick sweep 5
Scissor 2
Sit-up to single leg 8
Total Sweeps 15
Passes (Position)
Half-Guard 1
Standing 5
Passes (Type)
knee through 5
knee up, from hg to mount 1
Total Passes 6
Taking the Back
from passing the guard 1
guard 4
Total Back-Takes 5
Submissions (Position)
Back 5
Side Control 2
Closed Guard 1
Half-Guard Top 1
Submissions (Type)
choke from back 5
armbar  2
omoplata 1
cross collar top 1
Total Subs 9
Start of Match
Guard Pull 11
Pulled on by opponent 3
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BishopBjj News

Reduce Injury, Increase Flexibility At Jiu Jitsu

[youtube http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=wmpqm9otPS0?rel=0&w=560&h=315]
I am an advocate of improving  personal performance to get better at things – especially in jiu jitsu. This doesn’t mean that physical development is the end-all-be-all of improving jiu jitsu, but it can be a very dynamic tool in streamlining your improvement. I hate the idea of a limited range of motion, or existing injury limiting the weapons at my disposal. Along with taking NeoCell Collagen Sport, NeoCell Collagen Joint Formula, these recent exercises have helped me prevent injuries, increase flexibility, and improve my jiu jitsu. I wanted share them with the community, as we have seen a strong influx of visitors since our last article on injuries in bjj. I hope you enjoy the video. I will have more up soon, what did you think so far?

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Live Technique and Perspective Videos

Omoplata Armbar! (Breakdown of competition footage)

[youtube http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=EoYn6L3fEKQ?rel=0&w=560&h=315]
Every now and then a particular movement or technique really catches your eye. In this case it was a recent omoplata armbar applied by 2013 breakout star Magid Hage. Checkout this submission he applied against accomplished black belt Samir Chantre. We put some of our new software to work in this latest breakdown. Let us know what you think.
 

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Live Technique and Perspective Videos

The Leg Drag Pass: 3 Masters From 3 Generations

[youtube http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=FqTqAuMEnF0?rel=0&w=560&h=315]

Check out our latest video that highlights three different areas of jiu jitsu, but only one move. The leg drag pass has improved greatly in popularity recently. Watch these 3 masters go to work using the movement.

leg drag jiu jitsu

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BishopBjj News

Podcast 5: Rafael Lovato Jr. and Budo Jake

rafael lovato - budo jake

Check out our latest podcast featuring Rafael Lovato Jr. and Budo Jake as guests.

Listen To Podcast